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Question about an old input jack  

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(@alon13)
New Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 2
28/08/2019 3:02 pm  

Hey guys, I'm new here and just want to start by saying its very nice that there is suck kind of a forum which discuss fixing and repairing of guitars!
Well to me question, I have an old soviet guitar which used to be my aunt s guitar when she was a child.
The guitar was not well preserved over the years and I'm trying to refurbish it and make it a little bit more usable.
The Input jack as you can see in the pictures https://imgur.com/a/SxfGKGH (hope the links are OK)
is something I don't know and I want to replace it to something more modern.. Is it possible? Havnt fount any input jack which looks like that..
Thanks for your kind help!


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(@hippychip)
Active Member
Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 15
28/08/2019 7:04 pm  

First of all---the correct term is output jack.
Secondly it looks like someone has shoved a plastic (acoustic guitar) bridge pin in the hole.
Pull the pin out, and see if it works.


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(@demoetc)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2168
28/08/2019 10:43 pm  

Yes, it might indeed be a bridge-pin, but it also looks like it could be some sort of RCA female (jack) connector. Since the guitar most likely is mono, you could unsolder the RCA jack and replace it with a standard 1/4" jack.

Best regards, and let us know how it goes :)


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(@alon13)
New Member
Joined: 3 months ago
Posts: 2
29/08/2019 7:59 pm  

Yes, it might indeed be a bridge-pin, but it also looks like it could be some sort of RCA female (jack) connector. Since the guitar most likely is mono, you could unsolder the RCA jack and replace it with a standard 1/4" jack.
Best regards, and let us know how it goes :)

Can you explain me how I need to solder a new jack? I mean there are a lot of output Jack's and they have 3 pins.. To which of the do I solder what?
Example of an output jack I found online
https://imgur.com/a/6AZ7RqT
First of all---the correct term is output jack.
Secondly it looks like someone has shoved a plastic (acoustic guitar) bridge pin in the hole.
Pull the pin out, and see if it works.

It's not a bridge pin.. That's the weird thing. Thanks for correcting me with the term if the output jack.


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(@demoetc)
Noble Member
Joined: 17 years ago
Posts: 2168
30/08/2019 1:02 am  

A 2-conductor 1/4" female jack would be a better replacement because I'm pretty sure the RCA jack that's now installed is two conductor. But if you already have a 1/4" 3-conductor, you would use just the 'ring' which I believe is the longest prong there, and the 'tip' which is the shortest. Find out which wire is now connected to the RCA jack's ring - the outer covering - and connect that wire to the 1/4" jack's sleeve - the solder-tab connected to the longest prong.

Then connect the wire now connected to the RCA jack's tip - the connector within that center hole - and solder that wire to the 1/4" jack's 'tip' - which is the tab of the shortest prong.

If you have a 3-connector 1/4" female jack, ignore the 'ring' connector, which is the middle-length prong and its solder-tab.

I hope this helps.


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